Public Health England

Blood in Pee Campaign Launched by Public Health England

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Public Health England (PHE) has recently launched a campaign to raise awareness of ‘blood in pee’ as a symptom of bladder and kidney cancers.

The main message is: If you notice blood in your pee, even if it’s ‘just the once’, tell your doctor. The advert will also highlight that finding cancer early makes it more treatable.

The primary target audience for the campaign is men and women over the age of 50.

Be Clear on Cancer aims to achieve earlier diagnosis of cancer by raising awareness of the signs and symptoms. The campaigns encourage people with relevant symptoms to see their GP without delay.

The ‘Blood in Pee’ campaign started off as regional pilots in early 2012 and since then the national campaign has run a number of times with the last campaign in 2016.

Resources that you can display in the workplace or other public areas can be downloaded from the PHE website.

Heat-health Watch Alert: Level 3 – Heatwave Action

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Issued at 8:27am on Wednesday, 25 July 2018.

There is a 90% probability of heatwave conditions between 9:00am on Monday and 9:00am on Saturday in parts of England.

NHS Choices have published a guide to how to cope in hot weather.

Hot weather could increase the health risks to vulnerable patients.

More details about the weather alert is available on the MET Office website.

Most of us welcome hot weather, but when it’s too hot for too long there are health risks. If a heatwave hits this summer, make sure the hot weather doesn’t harm you or anyone you know.

Why is a heatwave a problem?

The main risks posed by a heatwave are:

  • dehydration (not having enough water)
  • overheating, which can make symptoms worse for people who already have problems with their heart or breathing
  • heat exhaustion and heatstroke

Who is most at risk?

A heatwave can affect anyone, but the most vulnerable people are:

  • older people, especially those over 75
  • babies and young children
  • people with a serious chronic condition, especially heart or breathing problems
  • people with mobility problems – for example, people with Parkinson’s disease or who have had a stroke
  • people with serious mental health problems
  • people on certain medications, including those that affect sweating and temperature control
  • people who misuse alcohol or drugs
  • people who are physically active – for example, labourers or those doing sports

Level 1 alert: be prepared

The Meteorological Office has a warning system that issues alerts if a heatwave is likely. Level 1 is the minimum alert and is in place from June 1 until September 15 (which is the period that heatwave alerts are likely to be raised).

Although you don’t have to do anything during a level 1 alert, it is advisable to be aware of what to do if the alert level is raised. Knowing how to keep cool during long periods of hot weather can help save lives.

Public Health England (PHE) has advice on how to stay safe during a heatwave (PDF).

Level 2 alert: heatwave is forecast

The Met Office raises an alert if there is a high chance that an average temperature of 30C by day and 15C overnight will occur over the next 2 to 3 days. These temperatures can have a significant effect on people’s health if they last for at least 2 days and the night in between.

Although you don’t need to take any immediate action, follow these steps in preparation:

  • Stay tuned to the weather forecast on the radio, TV or social media, or the Met Office.
  • If you’re planning to travel, check the forecast at your destination.
  • Learn how to keep cool at home with the beat the heat checklist (PDF).

Level 3 alert: when a heatwave is happening

This alert is triggered when the Met Office confirms there will be heatwave temperatures in one or more regions.

Follow the instructions for a level 2 alert. The following tips apply to everybody when it comes to keeping cool and comfortable, and reducing health risks.

Tips for coping in hot weather

  • Shut windows and pull down the shades when it is hotter outside. You can open the windows for ventilation when it is cooler.
  • Avoid the heat: stay out of the sun and don’t go out between 11am and 3pm (the hottest part of the day) if you’re vulnerable to the effects of heat.
  • Keep rooms cool by using shades or reflective material outside the windows. If this isn’t possible, use light-coloured curtains and keep them closed (metallic blinds and dark curtains can make the room hotter).
  • Have cool baths or showers, and splash yourself with cool water.
  • Drink cold drinks regularly, such as water and diluted fruit juice. Avoid excess alcohol, caffeine (tea, coffee and cola) or drinks high in sugar.
  • Listen to alerts on the radio, TV and social media about keeping cool.
  • Plan ahead to make sure you have enough supplies, such as food, water and any medications you need.
  • Identify the coolest room in the house so you know where to go to keep cool.
  • Wear loose, cool clothing, and a hat and sunglasses if you go outdoors.
  • Check up on friends, relatives and neighbours who may be less able to look after themselves.

If you have concerns about an uncomfortably hot house that is affecting your health or someone else’s, get medical advice.

You can also get help from the environmental health office at your local authority. They can inspect a home for hazards to health, including excess heat. Visit GOV.UK to find your local authority.

Level 4 alert: severe heatwave

This is the highest heatwave alert in Britain. It is raised when a heatwave is severe and/or prolonged, and is an emergency situation.

At level 4, the health risks from a heatwave can affect fit and healthy people, and not just those in high-risk groups. These groups include the elderly, the very young and people with chronic medical conditions.

Follow the information given above for a level 3 alert. Check that anyone around you who is in a high-risk group is coping with the heat.

How do I know if someone needs help?

Seek help from a GP or contact NHS 111 if someone is feeling unwell and shows symptoms of:

  • breathlessness
  • chest pain
  • confusion
  • intense thirst
  • weakness
  • dizziness
  • cramps which get worse or don’t go away

Get the person somewhere cool to rest. Give them plenty of fluids to drink.

Be Clear on Cancer Campaign – 22 February to 31 March 2018

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In February 2018, Public Health England will be launching a national campaign aimed at raising awareness of the symptoms of breast cancer in women aged 70 and over.

What is Be Clear on Cancer?

Be Clear on Cancer aims to help improve early diagnosis of cancer by raising awareness of symptoms and encouraging people to see their GP without delay.

The key message promoted on TV will be: ‘1 in 3 women who get breast cancer are over 70, so don’t assume you’re past it.’ The advert also reinforces the message that finding it early makes it more treatable.

A second message, promoted via other campaign materials, will be: ‘A lump isn’t the only sign of breast cancer’ and that women over 70 should tell their doctor if they notice any changes to their breasts.

You can get breast cancer at any age but the older you are the more likely you are to get it. 1 in 3 women who get breast cancer are over 70 so older women need to know what their breasts normally look and feel like so they can spot any changes.
If breast cancer is found early it is more treatable.
Read the rest of this entry »

Active 10 – Walk 10 Brisk Minutes a Day for Better Health

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Public Health England are promoting brisk walking for just 10 minutes a day.

A brisk 10 minute walk every day can make a difference to your health. Each 10 minute burst of exercise is known as an “Active 10”.

A Press Release from PHE reports that 4 out of 10 (41%) adults aged 40 to 60 in England walk less than 10 minutes continuously each month at a brisk pace.

Brisk walking is simply walking faster than usual, at a pace that gets your heart pumping. Start with a 10 minute brisk walk a day and then see if you can gradually build up to more.

It’s the easy way to improve your health and wellbeing. No gym memberships, no Lycra. Just 10 minutes and you!
The free Active 10 app for smartphones and tablet computers (including iPads) takes away the guesswork. It shows how much brisk walking you’re doing and how you can do more. It’s easy to use and helps you set your goals for the day.
A regular 10 minute brisk walk can make you feel better in so many ways. It can boost your energy, clear your head and lift your mood.It can help people with lower back pain and those at risk of high blood pressure.It’s also seriously good for your long-term health – it can reduce your risk of serious illnesses like heart disease and type 2 diabetes.

Taking at least 1 brisk 10 minute walk a day has been shown to reduce the risk of early death by 15%. A 10 minute walk can contribute to meeting the CMO’s physical activity guidance of 150 minutes of moderate to vigorous exercise each week. This can lead to health benefits including a lowered risk of type 2 diabetes (by 40%), cardiovascular disease (by 35%), dementia (by 30%) and some cancers (by 20%).

The severity of the current physical inactivity epidemic amongst adults contributes to 1 in 6 deaths in the UK and is costing the NHS over £0.9 billion per year.

Read more at https://www.nhs.uk/oneyou/active10/home#qha3yo9cF9P6rGLX.99

Active 10 – Walk 10 Brisk Minutes a Day for Better Health

Posted on Updated on

Public Health England are promoting brisk walking for just 10 minutes a day.

A brisk 10 minute walk every day can make a difference to your health. Each 10 minute burst of exercise is known as an “Active 10”.

A Press Release from PHE reports that 4 out of 10 (41%) adults aged 40 to 60 in England walk less than 10 minutes continuously each month at a brisk pace.

Brisk walking is simply walking faster than usual, at a pace that gets your heart pumping. Start with a 10 minute brisk walk a day and then see if you can gradually build up to more.

It’s the easy way to improve your health and wellbeing. No gym memberships, no Lycra. Just 10 minutes and you!
The free Active 10 app for smartphones and tablet computers (including iPads) takes away the guesswork. It shows how much brisk walking you’re doing and how you can do more. It’s easy to use and helps you set your goals for the day.
A regular 10 minute brisk walk can make you feel better in so many ways. It can boost your energy, clear your head and lift your mood.It can help people with lower back pain and those at risk of high blood pressure.It’s also seriously good for your long-term health – it can reduce your risk of serious illnesses like heart disease and type 2 diabetes.

Taking at least 1 brisk 10 minute walk a day has been shown to reduce the risk of early death by 15%. A 10 minute walk can contribute to meeting the CMO’s physical activity guidance of 150 minutes of moderate to vigorous exercise each week. This can lead to health benefits including a lowered risk of type 2 diabetes (by 40%), cardiovascular disease (by 35%), dementia (by 30%) and some cancers (by 20%).

The severity of the current physical inactivity epidemic amongst adults contributes to 1 in 6 deaths in the UK and is costing the NHS over £0.9 billion per year.

Read more at https://www.nhs.uk/oneyou/active10/home#qha3yo9cF9P6rGLX.99

Stub out smoking this Stoptober

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stoptoberSmokers across Calderdale are being urged to kick the habit during Stoptober.

Stoptober is the mass challenge to quit smoking set by Public Health England, which started on Saturday 1 October and is being supported by Calderdale Council.

Last year more than 800 people in Calderdale signed up for Stoptober, and this year the Council wants even more people to get on board and experience the health benefits of stopping smoking… read more…

This Stoptober, Yorkshire Smokefree Calderdale is running a campaign alongside Stoptober about knowing your carbon monoxide level. Carbon monoxide is a poisonous gas and is given off when someone smokes. When breathed in, it produces a thick, fatty plaque that can cause heart disease, stroke and bad circulation.

For information and support to quit smoking, visit calderdale.yorkshiresmokefree.nhs.uk