Time to Talk Day

Time to Talk Day 2019 Helping With Mental Health

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This year’s Time to Talk Day on Thursday 7 February  is all about bringing together the right ingredients, to have a conversation about mental health. Whether that’s tea, biscuits and close friends or a room full of people challenging mental health stigma, we want you to get talking. Mental health problems affect one in four of us, yet people are still afraid to talk about it. Time to Talk Day encourages everyone to talk about mental health.

Having conversations about mental health helps break down stereotypes, improve relationships, aid recovery and take the stigma out of something that affects us all. There are lots of different ways to have a conversation about mental health. And you don’t have to be an expert to talk.

However you do it, make sure you have a conversation about mental health this Time to Talk Day. From a coffee morning at your work, to a stall handing out materials at your local train station, there are lots of activities you can do to get people talking on Time to Talk Day.

Andy’s Man Club is a talking group, a place for men to come together in a safe environment to talk about issues/problems they be have faced or currently are facing. The benefit is there are other men who have been in similar situations and can help you with advice on how they have dealt with the situation. Some of the aims are to provide beneficial services, we will look at bringing in solicitors who can give advice about fathers seeing their children, running debt management classes for those with gambling addictions or money troubles as well as the possibility of anger management classes and even activity sessions ranging from sports like Rugby, Football, Basketball to walks and Fitness classes.

Time to Talk Day – Thursday 1 February 2018

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Around 1 in 4 people will experience a mental health problem this year yet the shame and silence can be as bad as the mental health problem itself. Your attitude to mental health could change someone’s life.

Too often, people who experience a mental health problem are also expected to take the lead on talking about mental health in the wider sense. Time to Talk Day encourages everyone to talk about mental health.

Mental health problems affect one in four of us yet people are still afraid to talk about it. For people with mental health problems not being able to talk about it can be one of the worst parts of the illness. So by getting people talking about mental health we can break down stereotypes, improve relationships, aid recovery and take the stigma out of something that affects us all.

Since Time to Talk Day first launched in 2014, it has sparked millions of conversations in schools, homes, workplaces, in the media and online.

The Time to Change organisation aims are to:

  • Improve public attitudes and behaviour towards people with mental health problems.
  • Reduce the amount of discrimination that people with mental health problems report in their personal relationships, their social lives and at work.
  • Make sure even more people with mental health problems can take action to challenge stigma and discrimination in their communities, in workplaces, in schools and online.
  • Create a sustainable campaign that will continue long into the future.

Their voice is stronger and louder thanks to funding by the Department of Health, Comic Relief and the Big Lottery Fund. The campaign is run by charities Mind and Rethink Mental Illness, and thousands more organisations have joined to make change happen.

Since Time to Change began in 2007, around 4.1 million adults in England have improved attitudes towards mental health problems – that’s an improvement of 9.6% between 2008 and 2016. And more people than ever are able to be open about their mental health problems.