WYHPartnership

West Yorkshire Health and Care Partnership Board Public meeting December 6th

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West Yorkshire Health and Care Partnership’s Partnership Board (WY HCP) will meet in public on Tuesday 6 December 2022 at 2pm. The meeting will be held online using digital technology and chaired by Cllr Tim Swift, Leader of Calderdale Council and Chair of Calderdale Health and Wellbeing Board.

Cllr Tim Swift

The Partnership Board further strengthens joint working arrangements between the NHS, councils, care providers, hospices, Healthwatch, the voluntary, community and social enterprise sector. Together, the Partnership improves health and care of all people living across the area.

The Board is an important group for the Partnership, which covers Bradford District and Craven, Calderdale, Kirklees, Leeds, and Wakefield District. It brings together elected members, executive and non-executives, and independent co-opted members in one decision making process. Its work aligns to the NHS West Yorkshire Integrated Care Board.

Board members will receive an update from Rob Webster CBE, CEO Lead for the Partnership. There will also be reports on the work we are doing to tackle poverty, supporting people to leave hospital, and an update on the refresh of the WY HCP’s five-year strategy as well as progress made from the recommendations of the Partnership’s Race Review.

Working alongside communities, the Partnership Board aims to give people their best start in life with support to stay healthy and live longer. Many factors determine whether someone leads a long and healthy life, including good housing, access to green space, and building an inclusive economy that creates more good jobs, reduces health inequalities, and promotes opportunity for all. These important factors are at the heart of the Partnership Board.

The Board meets in public every three months and gives people the opportunity to ask questions and have their say.  Members of the public will be able to ask a question at the start of the meeting via a video link.  All questions submitted will receive a written response after the meeting and will be published on the Partnership’s website.

Members of the public are asked to email their questions to westyorkshire.ics@nhs.net before Monday 5 December at 5pm – highlighting the question to be asked at the Board. People can also call 01924 317659 to submit questions. Members of the public who want to ask a question will then be sent a Microsoft Teams link to the meeting. 

The agenda, papers, and link to watch the meeting live can be accessed from Tuesday 29 November evening at: www.wypartnership.co.uk/meetings/partnershipboard/papers

 You can find out more about asking questions to the Board at:  www.wyhpartnership.co.uk/meetings/partnershipboard/questions

Health and care leaders back a trauma informed approach across West Yorkshire

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Health and care leaders across West Yorkshire are united in their support to tackle and address barriers that people affected by trauma can experience when accessing care.

The West Yorkshire Adversity, Trauma and Resilience Programme, jointly delivered by West Yorkshire Health and Care Partnership (WY HCP) and West Yorkshire Violence Reduction Unit (VRU), has an ambition to ensure West Yorkshire is a trauma informed and responsive system by 2030. Initiatives to prevent harm and improve wellbeing, particularly for those who are most vulnerable and face multiple difficulties, include:

  • Training to thousands of multi-agency colleagues including the police, schools, housing providers, primary care, accident and emergency and local authorities
  • Developing an adversity, trauma and resilience web portal bringing shared resources together – coming soon

West Yorkshire’s Deputy Mayor for Policing and Crime, Alison Lowe OBE is also the Senior Responsible Officer for the Adversity, Trauma and Resilience Programme and said:

“People who experience adversity and trauma are at higher risk of poor physical and mental health. Children are more likely to adopt anti-social and health-harming behaviours, get involved in violence, be excluded from school and attain low exam results. Adults facing multiple disadvantages can be more predisposed to addictions, dying by suicide and being absent from work than those who don’t.

“While fully eradicating trauma remains unlikely, by working together we can help to strengthen community resilience, mitigate existing harm and ultimately improve lives for people living and working in West Yorkshire.”

Chief Superintendent Jackie Marsh, West Yorkshire Violence Reduction Unit (VRU) Director, said: “Collaboration is key to make sure that we do not add to harm and that we work in ways that mitigate the impact of where there has been harm already.

“Trauma and adversity cannot be prevented and responded to by one sector. That’s why it’s crucial that all our organisations and system leaders work together and that we listen to grassroots expertise to deliver the shifts in culture and practice needed to achieve our vision of ensuring the area is trauma-informed and responsive to people’s needs. We have a way to go but that work has started and is happening right now across West Yorkshire.”

The West Yorkshire Adversity, Trauma and Resilience Programme was set up in June 2020 and comprises over 300 members.

Take antibiotics seriously this World Antimicrobial Awareness Week

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[ Excerpt – read full article here ]

The NHS in West Yorkshire will be joining health organisations around the world to raise awareness of the global problem of antibiotic resistance and to encourage people to pledge to tackle it.

According to the World Health Organisation, antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is one of the biggest threats to global health. Drug-resistant infections killed 1.25 million people in the world in 2019, including 141,000 patients in high income countries like the UK. This is estimated to rise to 10 million deaths per year by 2050 if we don’t act now.

Antibiotics kill bacteria or prevent them from spreading, but because bacteria are adapting to survive them, these medicines are becoming less effective. If antibiotics stop working to treat infections, this might stop us from carrying out common healthcare activities such as doing major operations or giving cancer treatments where infections are common, and we need effective antibiotics to prevent them. We may see more premature babies, children and adults on intensive care dying from infections.

That’s why healthcare professionals across the region are supporting Seriously Resistant (www.seriouslyresistant.com), a campaign originally developed in Leeds that aims to raise awareness of antibiotic resistance and educate people how they can help to keep antibiotics working.

“You can pledge to make better use of antibiotics and help save these vital medicines from becoming obsolete by becoming an Antibiotic Guardian – antibioticguardian.com/

“To find out what you, your family and friends can do to help tackle antibiotic resistance and to help keep antibiotics working, please also visit www.seriouslyresistant.com

Vaccination chief urges people to get boosted as West Yorkshire hits the half million milestone

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The leader of the West Yorkshire Vaccination Programme has rolled up his sleeves to encourage people to get their autumn booster as soon as possible.

Dr James Thomas, Medical Director for the West Yorkshire Integrated Care Board and practising GP, celebrated the rollout passing the half million milestone this week by getting his own top-up dose.

Just over a million people in West Yorkshire are eligible for the vital top-up jab, and over half of these have now been vaccinated. With COVID, flu and other respiratory illnesses in circulation and infection rates on the rise, Dr Thomas is urging everyone who is eligible to get their booster now to ensure maximum protection throughout the winter and festive period.

Dr Thomas said: “I am so grateful to our vaccination teams in West Yorkshire for all they are doing to get people protected ahead of what we know will be a hugely challenging winter. NHS staff and GP and pharmacy colleagues have been working flat out to protect those most susceptible to serious illness from both COVID and flu and delivered over 120,000 boosters a week during October, which is a fantastic achievement

.

“As we head into the winter months and busy festive season, the booster offers important protection and peace of mind for those at greatest risk and their loved ones, so if you are eligible for the booster and yet to come forward, I strongly urge you to roll up your sleeves and get the jab done!”

Everyone aged 50 and over, or who has a condition that puts them at greater risk from COVID-19 is eligible for the vital top-up jab to keep their immunity as high as possible this winter. This includes people with weakened immune systems, learning disabilities and pregnant women. Frontline health and care workers and unpaid carers are also eligible and being urged to protect themselves and those they care for by getting their booster and flu jabs.

Anyone eligible can book an appointment on the National Booking Service at www.nhs.uk/covidvaccine or by calling 119 free of charge. The West Yorkshire programme is also running a large number of walk-in and pop up clinics in local communities to make it as easy as possible for people to get their booster. People can search for clinics near them at www.nhs.uk/grab-a-jab

Rachel Spencer-Henshall, Public Health Lead for the West Yorkshire Integrated Care Board, said: “It is great that so many people have already made the smart choice to get their booster. We know that with winter comes both increased infection levels and also increased socialising indoors where viruses spread more easily. The increase in COVID infections is very concerning and latest data the UK Health Security Agency shows that flu infection rates are also on the rise so I would urge everyone who is eligible to get both their booster and their flu jab to keep them safe this winter.

Together we Can campaign to help the NHS

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West Yorkshire Health and Care Partnership (WY HCP) is set to once again run ‘Together We Can’ this winter. The campaign helps people access health and care services at the right time and place.

The campaign also encourages people to choose well and to opt for convenient self-care, where safe to do so during the winter months.

Ruth Buchan, Chief Executive Officer for Community Pharmacy West Yorkshire, said: ”As health services will be extremely busy this winter, we’re asking for everyone to play their part and to be better prepared during the cold and flu season. You can protect yourself and each other by having a flu jab and seeking advice for minor health concerns from your community pharmacy if needed. Our trained healthcare staff can help you choose over counter medicines and offer a range of clinical services too”.

The campaign has an easy to navigate website [togetherwe-can.com]. Here you will find help and advice and tips for keeping well this winter, as well as other useful information on how to stay healthy.

Dr Adam Sheppard, a Wakefield GP and Chair of West Yorkshire Urgent and Emergency Care Programme Board said: “Health and care services are here to help. During winter and times of significant pressure on local services, we still encourage the public to come forward and not to delay if they need help or are concerned about their health, but we want to ensure they’re using the right services and they know when to go to a pharmacy, use NHS 111 or their GP practice.  You can save time by ordering prescriptions and seeking medical advice online by downloading the NHS App. Find out all you need to know this winter by visiting togetherwe-can.com”

Together we can choose well this winter.  Together we can make a real difference so please:

  • Access online services. You can book appointments or order repeat prescriptions through the NHS App. Visit 111.nhs.uk or call 111 if you need urgent medical help 24/7 and can’t access the internet.
  • Remember GP practices are here to help and will ensure you get the right care appropriate for your needs.
  • Have your flu and COVID-19 vaccines. If you’re over 50, pregnant or have a long-term medical condition, get your free jabs.
  • Take good care this winter there’s lots you can do to stay well and protect yourselves and others around you this winter.
  • Visit your local community pharmacy for medical advice and treatments for things like colds, tummy troubles, rashes, and pains.
  • A range of urgent care services are available to ensure people can access the right care for their needs. This ensures Accident and Emergency Departments (A&E) are freed up to treat those that need it most including emergencies, those with serious injuries and life-threatening situations like heart attacks.
  • Don’t wait until you are in mental health crisis. There’s a wide range of support and resources available for everyone, including a 24/7 free phone line. Visit togetherwe-can.com/mental-health
  • We can all spread the kindness this winter by looking out for each other and our neighbours. Visit: ourneighbours.org.uk

New fellows sought to help improve population health in West Yorkshire

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West Yorkshire Health and Care Partnership’s Improving Population Health Fellowship is back for a second year, and is looking for more fellows to help make a positive difference.

If you want to find out more, we are hosting two events on 8 and 23 November from 2pm to 3:30pm. Contact verity.phillips3@nhs.net and caroline.andrews16@nhs.net for an invitation.

You can also visit our website for more information.

The Improving Population Health Fellowship, which is part of West Yorkshire Health and Care Partnership (WY HCP) expands on the successful first year of the Health Equity Fellowship, launched in 2021. The Health Equity Fellowship saw 33 fellows from health and care sectors carry out projects aimed at tackling health inequalities, including projects targeting children’s health, mentoring people and self-managing diabetes.

We are now looking for a total of 70 fellows across four different areas of the Improving Population Health Fellowship:

  • Health Equity: 30 fellows
  • Adversity Trauma and Resilience: 30 fellows
  • Suicide Prevention: five fellows
  • Climate Change: five fellows

Dr Sohail Abbas, Deputy Medical Director, NHS West Yorkshire Integrated Care Board and Chair of the Health Inequalities Network, for WY HCP said: “We are delighted to launch year two of our fellowship now even bigger than before. If you are passionate about making a real difference to our local communities this could be the programme for you. That might be about tackling health inequalities, addressing barriers that people affected by trauma can experience when accessing services, protecting our environment or helping to prevent suicide.”

Being a fellow involves working on a project relevant to your fellowship theme and delivering it in your workplace, or by joining a system-wide initiative across West Yorkshire. Fellows will need to dedicate a day each week to carry out the fellowship training (mainly delivered virtually) and the project work.

The Fellowship will run from March 2023 to March 2024. We welcome applications from all health and care sectors, including community and voluntary colleagues across West Yorkshire.

Robin Tuddenham, Place Lead for Calderdale and joint Chair of the Improving Population Health Programme Board said: “The fellowship is designed to attract applicants that are representative of the communities we serve. Last year we saw some fantastic projects being delivered and, in some cases, expanded to other areas helping to create more equitable health and care systems and reduce health inequalities. This year we look forward to welcoming 70 more fellows with new ideas, tactics and perspectives to pioneer change and meet our ambitions.”

Applications are open from 7 November and close on 9 December. To apply all you need to do is complete a statement of interest. The Fellowship is open to all primary, secondary, community and voluntary sector colleagues across West Yorkshire irrespective of current job role, grade or profession.

Aziz-ur Rehman, a Health Equity Fellow from year one, said: “This is the first time I have been valued for my overall knowledge around the wider health agenda and I felt totally comfortable with every aspect of the fellowship. It is certainly not there to trip you up but to nurture what you have and make it usef

NHS West Yorkshire partnership organisation meets in public 15 November

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The NHS West Yorkshire Integrated Care Board (ICB) will meet in public for the third time on Tuesday 15 November at the Briar Court Hotel, Halifax Rd, Birchencliffe, Huddersfield HD3 3NT.

The Board is part of the legislation set out in the Health and Care Act 2022which came into force on the 1 July 2022. It focuses on improving outcomes for people by addressing health inequalities, the difference in care received and effective use of budgets across the area. It is part of West Yorkshire Health and Care Partnership (WY HCP), an integrated care system.

The board’s role includes agreeing a plan for health and care services in West Yorkshire that delivers the five-year strategy. Most decisions about circa £5billion budget and the services delivered locally are made in the five local places of West Yorkshire, via its strong local place partnerships in Bradford District and Craven, Calderdale, Kirklees, Leeds, and Wakefield District.

The board also works alongside care provider collaboratives, such as The West Yorkshire Association of Acute Trusts, the Mental Health, Learning Disability and Autism Collaborative, Community Care Collaborative and hospices working together.  The board has an independent chair, Cathy Elliott.  Its Chief Executive is Rob Webster CBE.

The meeting on the 15 November will include an update report from Cathy and Rob, as well as items on primary care, winter planning and updates from the five local place partnerships.

People are asked to contact westyorkshire.ics@nhs.net before Monday the 14 November at 9am if they would like to attend or submit questions. They can also call 01924 317659 to submit questions or to book their place to attend.

People can also read the papers, or watch live online by visiting www.wypartnership.co.uk/meetings/integrated-care-board

New People’s Panel for West Yorkshire Health and Care Partnership Survey

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People across West Yorkshire are being asked to help shape a new people’s panel which will play an important role in advising health and care services across the area.  With already strong mechanisms in place to hear from people in Bradford District and Craven, Calderdale, Kirklees, Leeds and Wakefield District, West Yorkshire Health and Care Partnership (WY HCP), want to build on this by giving people an opportunity to also have a voice at a West Yorkshire level.

Take the survey here : www.tinyurl.com/wypanel22 by November 11
or read to the end to find how you can complete a paper copy

WY HCP, which plans and delivers health and care services for people across the area, has asked West Yorkshire Healthwatch organisations, the independent health and care champions, to develop a new panel. The panel will be made up of people and communities from across the area. It aims to empower people to have their say about services and to put the voice of people at the heart of decision-making at a West Yorkshire level.

Working with existing and new networks across local areas, people will have the opportunity to get involved in influencing decisions made by the new NHS West Yorkshire Integrated Care Board and the West Yorkshire Health and Care Partnership Board.

Sharanjit Boughan, West Yorkshire Healthwatch said: “Ensuring diverse voices are heard from across the area is essential to help health and care services meet the needs of all our communities. We especially want to hear the voices of those who experience the greatest health inequalities and who we might not usually hear from. Please come forward and get involved”.

Cathy Elliott, Chair of the NHS West Yorkshire Integrated Care Board said: “As the independent champion for anyone using health and care services, Healthwatch is a key partner within WY HCP and ideally placed to do this essential work on our behalf. We really want to reach as many people as possible, so that we can make sure people’s feedback and experiences of local services are heard at the highest level. This is ultimately all about making the right decisions and ones that make a positive difference to everyone’s lives”.

Anyone interested in helping to shape the panel is invited to take part in a survey and share their thoughts and ideas, including what the panel will be called and how people could be supported to get involved. The survey can be accessed at www.tinyurl.com/wypanel22 – alternatively, for a paper copy or to request alternative formats, or to be taken through the questions on the phone, contact your local Healthwatch. The survey closes for comments on the Friday 11 November 2022.

Partnership backs World Suicide Prevention Day 2022 and urges all those struggling to reach out

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West Yorkshire Health and Care Partnership (WY HCP) have once again pledged their support to World Suicide Prevention Day 2022 and urged anyone who is struggling with their mental health to reach out for help.

The theme for this year’s World Suicide Prevention Day – spearheaded by the International Association for Suicide Prevention (IASP) – is ‘creating hope through action,’ aiming to raise awareness around the globe that suicide can be prevented.

Suicide prevention is one of the ten ambitions of WY HCP with figures from the Office for National Statistics (ONS) showing that the area has higher suicide rates than England as whole.

The latest figures released this week for 2021*, also show the three-year rolling rates have risen in all areas of West Yorkshire, except for Kirklees, compared to those three-year rates released in 2020.

In Leeds, suicide rates have risen from 13.3 to 13.9 per 100,000 people, in Wakefield from 16.2 to 17.3, in Calderdale from 15.6 to 16.9 and in Bradford from 9.2 to 9.8.

West Yorkshire also saw a rise from 12.6 per 100,000 people to 13.2 – compared to the England average, which has remained the same, at 10.4 per 100,000 people.

The suicide rate for Kirklees fell from 11.8 to 11.2 per 100,000 people.

[NB It’s helpful to note that the registrations of deaths with coroners are up to end of 2021 and this may not be reflective of the current position now.]

Rob Webster CBE, CEO Lead for WY HCP said: “It’s clear that periods of recession and financial distress increase the chances of suicide in our population.

“We can prevent this from becoming a reality.

“Knowing the signs and being able to have the conversation with someone is a skill that we can all develop.

“This Suicide Prevention Day I’m urging everyone to take the free 20-minute training provided at www.zerosuicidealliance.com – you might just save a life.”

Jess Parker, project manager for WY HCP’s Suicide Prevention Programme said: “These figures show that on average, over the last three years to 2021, there have been rises in suicide rates across West Yorkshire, except for Kirklees.

“With the economic pressures faced by people and communities, the risk of suicide may increase going forward.

“We know that households are struggling with financial worries at the moment, so we want them to be aware of the support that is available and to reach out if they feel they need it.

“Feeling suicidal is something that we don’t want anyone to go through alone. We realise that many factors can be at play, like relationship breakdown, bereavement, financial difficulties, addiction and ill-health.”

The WY HCP Suicide Prevention website brings together the broad range of support on offer across all areas of West Yorkshire for anyone struggling with their mental health or in a crisis – including for gambling issues and self-harm, young people, LGBTQ+, parents, veterans, and bereavement.

It is also a hub of information on suicide prevention including latest news and blogs, resources for professionals and the training available to all, including that offered by Zero Suicide Alliance.

Jess added: “We all need to be aware of the risk of suicide – residents, employers, colleagues, workers across the public sector – take the training and you could potentially help save a life.

“To all those struggling, know that support is out there and reach out – there are people ready and waiting to help.”

WY HCP’s Suicide Prevention Programme has been carrying out intensive work – based on its five-year strategy launched earlier this year – towards an ambition of reducing the suicide rate by ten per cent before 2027.

Recent measures include recruiting people with personal experience of suicide into a project to help shape future prevention work, improvements to the sharing of real-time information on suspected suicides across West Yorkshire and securing funding to invest in suicide prevention training for frontline workers.

For the full range of suicide prevention support and resources available in West Yorkshire visit www.suicidepreventionwestyorkshire.co.uk.

The Samaritans provide 24-hour support on 116 123 or email jo@samaritans.org.uk.

West Yorkshire Partnership Shortlisted for the 2022 HSJ Awards

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SETTING THE STANDARD FOR HEALTHCARE EXCELLENCE: WEST YORKSHIRE PARTNERSHIP SHORTLISTED FOR THE 2022 HSJ AWARDS

 

West Yorkshire Health and Care Partnership (WY HCP) is proud to reveal that they have been shortlisted for several awards at this year’s HSJ Awards, recognising outstanding contribution to healthcare and earning the opportunity to showcase their achievements on a national platform. This includes being short listed for Integrated Care System (ICS) of the Year and Communications Initiative of the Year Award for their Root Out Racism Movement, developed in partnership with West Yorkshire Violence Reduction Unit. West Yorkshire Vascular Service has also been shortlisted for the HSJ Provider Collaboration of the Year.

Other organisations which make up WY HCP, including Bradford District and Craven Health and Care Partnership, were shortlisted in the Performance Recovery Award Category for Technology and Relationships Improving Flow. Leeds Community Healthcare NHS Trust has also been shortlisted for the Staff Wellbeing Award.

WY HCP won the HSJ Award for ICS of the Year in 2021.

The pressures faced across the healthcare sector haven’t been far from the headlines over the past 12 months – yet the quality and overriding positivity of the award entries this year highlight the enduring devotion of workers within the health and social care industry, dedicated to improving patient outcome.

A staggering 1067 entries have been received for the HSJ Awards 2022, with 219 projects and individuals making it to the final shortlist (from across 162 organisations). The high volume – and exceptional quality – of applications is once again reflecting the breadth of innovation and care within the UK’s healthcare networks.

Now in its 42nd year, the HSJ Awards continue to provide an opportunity to shine a light on the outstanding efforts and achievements that individuals and teams across the sector deliver daily.

Of the 25 categories, three are new for 2022, representing some of the recent challenges and triumphs within the NHS. These comprise new awards for Covid Vaccination Programme, Reducing Healthcare Inequalities and Performance Recovery Award.

The judging panel was made up of a diverse range of highly influential and respected figures within the healthcare community, including; Sarah-Jane Marsh (Chief Executive, Birmingham Women’s and Children’s FT); David Probert (Chief Executive, University College London Hospitals Foundation Trust); Dr Bola Owolabi (Director Health Inequalities, NHS England and NHS Improvement); Eugine Yafele (Chief Executive, University Hospitals Bristol and Weston NHS Foundation Trust); Tracy Allen (Chief Executive Officer, Derbyshire Community Health Services Foundation Trust)

Following the thorough judging process, WY HCP was shortlisted, ahead of the official awards ceremony to be held later this year (November 17th).

Shortlist for ICS of the Year: Since 2016, WY HCP focus has been on the collective difference they make to people’s lives, improving quality and efficiency of services. This long-term change covers all aspects of integrating health and care and making lasting improvements to inequalities by concentrating on wider determinants of health as set out in WY HCP’s improving population health annual report 2021/22. The five local places (Bradford District and Craven, Calderdale, Kirklees, Leeds, and Wakefield District), provider collaboratives, primary care networks, VCSE, communities and local people are the vehicles for change. WY HCP tackle issues reaching far beyond the ‘NHS norm. WY HCP won the HSJ Award for ICS of the Year in 2021.

Being short listed for Communications Initiative of the Year, a WY HCP race review (2020) identified the need for an anti-racism movement aimed at colleagues and communities. The Partnership serves one of the most ethnically diverse areas in the UK (20% of people are from minority ethnic communities), and its structure offers a reach of 100,000+ workforce, with a population of 2.4 million. The Root Out Racism Movement was co-created with a project group of 42 colleagues and over 100 other staff involved in focus groups, the majority of whom have a lived experience of racism. The movement has over 550 organisations and community champion supporters.

HSJ editor Alastair McLellan, said: “On behalf of all my colleagues, it gives me great pleasure to congratulate WY HCP on being shortlisted as a finalist in the category of ICS of the Year and Communications Initiative of the Year. All of the applications represent the ‘very best of the NHS’ and often leave our esteemed panel of judges with an impossible choice!

 

“Year on year the number of entrants continue to rise which I find so encouraging and is testament to the effect that HSJ Awards can have on improved staff culture and morale.

 

“We’re all very much looking forward to welcoming our finalists to the awards ceremony in November, celebrating their impressive achievements and jointly acknowledging our values of sharing best practice, improving patient outcomes and continuously driving for better service. But we never forget that the award ceremony is not just a celebration within a night, but a platform to recognise the hard work of all our NHS staff, all year round.”

The full list of nominees for the 2022 HSJ awards can be found at https://awards.hsj.co.uk/ alongside details of the Awards partners; https://awards.hsj.co.uk/partners

The selected winners will be announced during the awards ceremony at the Battersea Evolution Centre, London on November 17th, 2022.